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Professor Peter Sturmey is Professor of Psychology at The Graduate Center and the Department of Psychology, Queens College, City University of New York where he is a member of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral program. He is also an Honorary Professor of Psychology at the Division of Health and Social Care Research, Kings College, London. He specialized in autism and other developmental disabilities,especially in the areas of applied behavior analysis, dual diagnosis, evidence-based practice, and staff and parent training.

He gained his PhD at the University of Liverpool, United Kingdom and subsequently taught at the University of the South West (Plymouth) and University of Birmingham, United Kingdom. He then worked for the Texas Department of Mental Retardation from 1990-2000 as Chief Psychologist, first at Abilene then San Antonio State School during a Federal class action law suit. There he supervised behavioral services and Masters level psychologists providing behavior support plans for severe behavioral and psychiatric disorders in adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities and implementing large-scale active treatment and restraint reduction programs.

Professor Sturmey has published 20 edited and authored books, over 200 peer reviewed papers, over 50 book chapters and made numerous presentations nationally and internationally, including recent presentations in Canada, Brazil and Italy. He has an active lab of doctoral students mostly working on developing and evaluating effective and efficient ways of training caregivers using modeling and feedback to use applied behavior analysis with children and adults with autism and other disabilities.

Since February 2015, Professor Sturmey has run the graduate level Current Topics in ABA series for board certified behavior analysts for ABAC. In early 2016 introduced 2 topics specifically geared towards masters and doctoral level counselors and psychologists, the first on clinical case formation and the second on evidence-based practice for autism.